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What’s That Lump in My Butt?

An unknown lump in your butt can seem scary until you’ve diagnosed the problem. In most cases, the lump can be cured by a simple in-office procedure, solution application, or prescribed medication. If very extensive, surgery may be required to permanently remove anal warts.

If you have diabetes, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, recurring constipation or diarrhea, or a sexually transmitted disease, you may be at a higher risk for unknown lumps, abscesses, or warts.

The specialists at Colorado Colon & Rectal Specialists in Parker, Colorado, can help diagnose your unknown lumps or anal warts. Dr. Lisa Perryman, MD, FACS, FASCRS, is board-certified in colon and rectal surgery and can diagnose and treat any unknown lumps or pain in your rectal area.

Diagnosing the problem

A lump in or around your behind area can be scary until you know what’s causing it. Several things may cause the lump, including an anal abscess, anal warts, anal tags, or anal fistulas.

What causes anal abscesses?

An anal abscess is caused when a cavity in the anus develops an infection and fills with pus. The abscess can be uncomfortable, especially when trying to sit. You may get an anal abscess if you’ve had an anal fissure (a tear in the anal canal), a sexually transmitted infection, or blocked anal glands.

Anal tags

Anal tags are small flaps of skin around your anus that may also feel like lumps. They’re typically painless and noncancerous, but they can cause irritation or itching. In most cases, anal skin tags are either the color of your skin or darker. 

Anal tags may not cause any irritation. If this is the case, and if you don’t care about their appearance, they may not require treatment. But if you want them removed, Dr. Perryman can do so with a simple in-office procedure. 

What are anal warts?

Anal warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). The warts are uncomfortable because they develop around and inside the anus or on the genital area. At first, they can appear small, sometimes the size of a pinhead. In some cases, they can grow large and cover the entire anal area. 

Symptoms of anal warts

Anal warts can be painful. Some of the symptoms that indicate you might have them: 

If you suspect you may have an anal wart, head to the doctor for a diagnosis and treatment plan to prevent the spread.

What are anal fistulas? 

An anal fistula occurs when bacteria and fecal matter invade a gland in the anal region, then move into the surrounding tissue. Most anal fistulas are surrounded by pus. Pain and swelling around the anal area, fever, or feeling fatigue may be a sign of an anal fistula. Anal fistulas generally require surgery. The surgery, known as a fistulotomy, is performed to convert the tunnel area between the skin and muscle into a groove that allows the anal tract to heal. 

The fear of unknown lumps in or near your behind area can be scary. Dr. Perryman can diagnose and treat these. If you’re experiencing an unknown lump, wart, or abscess, visit the specialists at Colorado Colon & Rectal Specialists. Call us or book your appointment online.

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